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Posts Tagged ‘beach clean-up’


Photo: Chhavi Sachdevx/PRI
On weekdays, Afroz Shah (center, in black hat) is a constitutional lawyer. On the weekends, he tries to spend at least four hours picking up trash at the beach in Mumbai.

Here is proof that “one and one and 50” really do make a million. Read about the personal mission of one man in India who put his love for the ocean into action and inspired countless others.

Chhavi Sachdev reports at Public Radio International (PRI), “Mumbai has 72 miles of coastline, some of it covered in mangroves and some of it sandy or rocky — but none of it is clean.

“There isn’t a beach culture here. It’s not a place for gathering and tanning —  more often it’s a public toilet, garbage dump and, sometimes, a free place to hang out. Exercising and running are next to impossible. The litter makes it an obstacle course. There are cows, crows and stray dogs — but there are also a gazillion candy wrappers, chips packages, cookie packages, shoes, bottles, detergent sachets, disposable cups, and thousands and thousands of blue and white plastic bags.

“But when the tide is out, hundreds of volunteers can be seen on their hands and knees — thankfully wearing gloves — and pulling all these things out of sand into a plastic tub. They’re here because of one man who’s basically tackling the trash problem head on.

“Afroz Shah is a constitutional lawyer and a full time ‘ocean lover and a beach cleaner.’ Two years ago, he moved to a beautiful apartment with a view of the ocean near Mumbai’s Versova Jetty. From his windows, he could see the sea, but, also, a disturbing amount of trash.

” ‘There was 5.5 feet of plastic at the northern end of the beach. It had piled up, piled up, piled up. So then I said I must do something,’ he explains. …

“Since Oct. 2015, he’s been clearing trash for four hours every weekend in what the United Nations has called the world’s biggest beach clean up ever. His efforts have inspired others.

“On this weekend, Shah is on the beach with 300 people. He’s in a blue T-shirt and trackpants, muddy sneakers and thick rubber gloves — which were a gift from a Norwegian volunteer. …

“When a TV reporter asks him to stand and answer some questions, he politely asks them to come crouch near him so he can keep working while they film.”

Read more about Shah and the volunteers’ wide variety of motivations, here.

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