Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘museum of modern art’

122819-hippo-playground-NYC

Time for more photos. Most were taken by me in New York and Massachusetts, but my friend Ann took the one of her granddaughter contemplating Abe Lincoln.

What would either Abe or Gracie think if they understood all that was going on in Washington today?

In the next photo, one of my own granddaughters and her friend enjoy candy canes and conversation after performing in a “Nutcracker” put on by their ballet school.

Then we have a book “sculpture” put together to measure donations to the library fund for its ambitious addition. The pile of books increases as the donations increase. I took a close-up of a giant replica of a local author’s bestseller.

Two snow pictures are next, followed by one of a squirrel I saw yesterday posing on a lion sculpture.

The decorated windows are at the Umbrella Arts Center, where I went to see a musical version of Tuck Everlasting before Christmas. The building was once a school. A magnificent makeover was completed just this year and includes a state-of-the-art theater, artist studios, rooms for pottery and classes of all kinds, and a new maker space.

Next we move on to New York, where I spent two nights after Christmas. At the top of this post is one of the many delightful Central Park playgrounds with wild animals to climb on. Alice in Wonderland mosaics are in the subway at 50th Street, and giant toy soldiers grace midtown for the holidays.

At the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), beautifully redesigned, I saw this Horace Pippin painting of Lincoln pardoning a sentry condemned for falling asleep on the job. I had received a text the day before from my daughter-in-law saying that she had just been learning about Pippin from my six-year-old granddaughter, thanks to A Splash of Red, a wonderful children’s book. So I texted the painting to them.

There follows one of Edward Hopper’s most famous lonely paintings — this one of a gas station in the middle of nowhere — and Edward Weston‘s “Hot Coffee, Mojave Desert, 1937.” Also from MoMA, a delightful cat by Morris Hirshfield (thanks, Paul, for identifying the artist).

The next day, I visited the Neue Galerie, which I adored. That museum, housed in a beautiful mansion, focuses on early 20th century German and Austrian art and design. I saw Gustav Klimt’s “Adele Bloch-Bauer” in gold and silver, lovely works by Egon Schiele, and a special exhibit of works by the tragic Ernst Ludwig Kirchner.

Unfortunately, they don’t let you take pictures there, so I shot brochures!

120719-Gracie-in-Washington

122119-Nutcracker-aftermath

121119-library-book-pedestal-in-snow

121119-Concord-authors-on-pedestal

121119-footbridge-in-snow

121119-snow-decorates-stream

122919-squirrel-poses-on-lion

120819-Umbrella-gets-festive

122719-Lewis-Carroll-rabbit-Manhattan-subway

122719-huge-toy-soldier-Manhattan

122719-Horace-Pippin-at-MOMA

122719-Pippin-plaque-MOMA

122719-Hopper-lonely-gas-station-MOMA

122719-Edward Weston Hot Coffee, Mojave Desert 1937

122719-Morris Hirshfield-cat-at-MoMA

122819-GERMAN-EXPRESSIONIST-MUSEUM

 

 

Read Full Post »

I’m always interested in new stories about street art and street artists. This one from the NY Times tells how street artist Swoon (otherwise known as Caledonia Curry) has been picked up by art museums.

Melena Ryzik writes, “With a glowing paper cutout pinned over her heart, the artist known as Swoon led a procession through the Brooklyn Museum early one summer night to her installation ‘Submerged Motherlands,’ a site-specific jumble that includes two cantilevered rafts, seemingly cobbled out of junk; a tree, of fabric and wire, that reaches to the rotunda; and nooks of stenciled portraits.

“A sellout crowd was there for a film premiere and multimedia concert, documenting and inspired by Swoon’s travel on the rafts. As the audience sat spellbound, Swoon, her red curls bobbing, flitted around, snapping photos, taking it all in.

“ ‘There’s that feeling that you get when you see something that you don’t understand the origin of: wonderment,’ she said. ‘It brings about a kind of innocence, and I love that. I love to witness it. I love to be a part of making those moments happen.’

“Since she began illegally pasting images around the city 15 years ago, Swoon has inspired a lot of wonderment. Born Caledonia Curry, she started her career as a street artist, but quickly leapfrogged to the attention of gallerists and museum curators, which let her expand to installation and performance art, often with an activist, progressive bent. Her intricate paper-cut portraits and cityscapes, often affixed to walls in hardscrabble places, are meant to disintegrate in place, a refrain to the life around them. Meanwhile, her socially minded work has focused on building cultural hubs for far-flung artistically welcoming communities. …

“ ‘When you look at the work of a lot of her peers, hers stands apart,’ said Sarah Suzuki, an associate curator at the Museum of Modern Art, which bought several Swoon pieces for its permanent collection in 2005. …

“In New Orleans, Swoon helped create a shantytown where each house is a musical instrument. In Braddock, Pa., a dwindling postindustrial landscape, she worked on an arts center in an abandoned church.”

The rest of the NY Times story is here. And you can read more about Caledonia Curry at her website and at wikipedia.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: