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Posts Tagged ‘University of California’

What? Another story on naps?

This time, no less a personage than Arianna Huffington of the Huffington Post is weighing in on the importance of catching 40 winks if you need them. She has written a book called The Sleep Revolution, in which she predicts that most offices will have nap rooms in the not-too-distant future.

“Huffington’s mission: to eliminate the stigma long associated with sleeping at work. … In the HuffPost newsroom, ‘having a nap in the middle of the afternoon is actually a performance-enhancing tool,’ she said. …

“Experts like Sara Mednick, a researcher at the University of California, recommend a short nap in the middle of the day because you won’t feel groggy when waking up.

“Other companies like Google, Zappos and Ben & Jerry’s are getting on board with the napping trend. All now have built nap rooms in their offices. …

“Sleep is ‘the gateway through which a life of well-being must travel,’ Huffington recently wrote. It allows people to be more productive, lead healthier lives and connect more deeply to themselves, she added.

“Huffington will soon embark on a college tour, where she plans to visit 50 schools with leading sleep experts.” More here.

Hmmm. Time for a nap.

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I have to say, I found this new research fascinating as I had been experiencing something similar to the contrast sensitivity described. And I was delighted to see you could train your eyes to counteract the perceptions that can cause a stumble.

Jan Hoffman writes at the NY Times, “As adults age, vision deteriorates. One common type of decline is in contrast sensitivity, the ability to distinguish gradations of light to dark, making it possible to discern where one object ends and another begins.

“When an older adult descends a flight of stairs, for example, she may not tell the edge of one step from the next, so she stumbles. At night, an older driver may squint to see the edge of white road stripes on blacktop. Caught in the glare of headlights, he swerves.

“But new research suggests that contrast sensitivity can be improved with brain-training exercises. In a study published [in March] in Psychological Science, researchers at the University of California, Riverside, and Brown University showed that after just five sessions of behavioral exercises, the vision of 16 people in their 60s and 70s significantly improved.”

Read more at the NY Times, here, or go straight to “Improving Vision Among Older Adults: Behavioral Training to Improve Sight,” here. Authors Denton J. DeLoss and George J. Andersen are from the University of California, and Takeo Watanabe is at Brown.

stairs

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