Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘photo’

101918-gravestone-shadow

My new photography resolution, which I hope to stick to through the winter, is to capture shadows whenever the sun is out. Apart from the fact that I really like sunlight and shadow, I know I can find examples even in months when the photographic attractions of flowers and sailboats are not in evidence.

Today’s photo collection includes Massachusetts fall color, decorations for Halloween (I particularly liked that there were three witches, as in Shakespeare), curiosities from the MIT Museum (I loved Arthur Ganson‘s walking wishbone — and all his kinetic sculptures), and a graffiti warning in a Central Square alley.

“Come away, O human child!
“To the waters and the wild
“With a faery, hand in hand,
“For the world’s more full of weeping than you can understand.”

Read the rest of the W.B. Yeats poem here.

101718-porch-shadow

101918-branch-shadow

102618-fall-color-Concord-Mass

102618-autumn-leaves

101418-purple-berries

101418-witches

101218-MIT-Museum

101218-Arthur-Ganson-walking-wishbone-machine

101218-Yeats-in-Cambridge-alley

Read Full Post »

There’s been a bit of a drought in my picture taking. I got so tired of winter, and now in spring I’m reluctant to shoot the same photos I shoot every year. Although when you think about it, it’s kind of beautiful that the same crocus, hellabore, and winter aconite pop up over the same creative neighbor’s stonewall year after year.

We’ve finally had some spring in New England. The very best sign of that was a lemonade stand I saw yesterday.

Two young girls were selling lemonade and flavored iced tea ($.75, mint leaves optional) and Rice Krispies Treats ($.25) while playing duets on the clarinet and violin. They told me they were raising money for a charity that provides instruments and music lessons to children in Haiti.

They were adorable. One girl pointed out their homemade signs. She said, “We didn’t have any big cardboard to make signs, so we got pizza for dinner last night.” The pizza box provided the needed cardboard.

The other pictures are pretty self-explanatory. The crocus flowers peeked up just before we had one of our numerous late snowstorms. The gorgeous architecture and shadows are thanks to the preservation ethos in Providence.

I was thrilled to see the opportunistic pansy poking through a stone curb. And the trout lilies. I had to take two shots of the trout lilies, the only wildflowers that still flourish after I took a walking class in local conservation lands 25 years ago.

(No worries: I didn’t steal flowers from the woods but was able to buy several varieties of wildflowers at a plant sale. Sometimes a solitary May Apple shows up near the trout lilies in my yard, but it is sad and lonely. The trillium never had a prayer as it is fussy about soil and likes to hang with a group. Perhaps the wild geraniums will bloom this year.)

042818-lemonade-for-worthy-cause

042818-young-musicians-raise-money

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

041218-crocus-blooming-before-storm

042318-Providence-architecture-and-shadows

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

042218-pansies-in-wall

042118-trout-lily-stucco-wall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

042118-trout-lily-brick-wal

 

Read Full Post »

010618-ice-lanterns-Arlington 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you don’t have to travel, ice and snow are not the burden they are to a driver. You can wander a little outside your home and take pictures, bake banana bread, put out carrots for the bunny that appears at dawn, feed the birds, make ice lanterns.

The ice lanterns above were made by John’s children, and the photo was taken by my daughter-in-law. I love the smoky, swirly, mysterious aura that she captured.

My own 2018 ice lantern is below. My husband was critical to the enterprise. If you want to make an ice lantern yourself, check out an earlier post, here. You need a really cold day.

Right before Christmas, I took several photos of ice on trees and bushes because it looked so pretty. I know it’s not good for plants, though.

Sandra M. Kelly is the photographer behind the two photos of frozen bodies of water in New Shoreham — water that hardly ever freezes. It didn’t stay frozen long enough for her to get shots of ice boat racing, however. New England is swinging too quickly from deep freeze to balmy.

The big snow January 4th produced the mountain I noticed in a parking lot and the deceptive cushions on Suzanne’s porch furniture.

010418-newest-ice-lantern

122417-nice-ice-not-great-for-bush

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

010318-lacy-ice

122417-when-ice-in-the-dooryard-bloomed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

010318-Sandra-Kelly-Block-islandJPG

010318-Sandra-Kelly-New-Shoreham-frozen-pond

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0518-snow-pile-in-parking-lot

010818-snow-pillows-Providence

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Today’s Bonus Tidbit

Suzanne will be showing Luna & Stella antique lockets Fridays at noon (Eastern Standard Time) through December 22 on Instagram Live. Go to @Lunaandstella .

You can also see these one-of-a-kind lockets on her Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/lunaandstella/. Suzanne will size and place a photo of your loved one in the locket of your choice. A few of the antique lockets are shown below.

Suzanne’s Mom

Luna-and-Stella-antique-lockets

Read Full Post »

092317-Amazon-Parrot-side-view

I’ll start with the parrot.

Do you ever think about how a slight change of routine can lead to something interesting? When I was commuting every day, I often missed my train, so I would tell myself maybe it’s OK. Maybe this means I’ll run into an old friend or make a new one or see something amazing out the window that I would have missed otherwise.

Last week, I walked home from an errand on a different side of the street because it was shadier, and I’m pretty sure I would have missed the parrot if I had stuck with routine. Such a small change! The owner returned as I was taking pictures and told me it was an Amazon Parrot. I was impressed that it hadn’t tried to exit the open window.

The next photos are of a local community garden. I tried to find out if the food bank could do gleaning there as I know the original donor wanted the land to feed the poor. Still researching that. It looked like a lot was going to waste there.

Next comes Verrill Farm, with flowers in pots and flowers you can pick yourself — under amazing skies. That farm seems to have especially wonderful skies. I also liked the sky over the church steeple.

The tree, of course, has a face. I don’t know if it’s an Ent. I hope so, but it wasn’t talking.

The next shot shows the early morning sun over Minuteman Park. Then you have some dancing ladies near the deciduous holly. And a photo of the parrot looking at me indignantly.

091617-September-garden

091617-Concord-community-garden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

091617-take-only-your-own-produce

091517-Verrrill-Farm-Concord

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

091517-pick-your-own-at-Verrill

091517-isthisheaven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

092117-face-in-tree

092717-Minuteman-Park-early-morning

 

 

 

 

 

 

092717-Grecian-dancers-and-holly

092317-Amazon-Parrot-face-forward

Read Full Post »

I had a kooky friend in high school who claimed she could analyze you from your description of your favorite scene. At first, I described something sunny with flowers and little brooks and birds singing in trees. Her analysis: I was conventional, appreciated safety.

I was offended and said I had other favorite scenes. I described a stormy ocean with huge waves and dark clouds racing above, driftwood tossed on a rocky shore. She didn’t want to accept that one. She didn’t believe it. Added that I sounded like I had a split personality.

All of which is to say that I do like both kinds of scenes but that for taking pictures, I really prefer sunlight. Here are a few recent photos. Mostly sunny, mostly Rhode Island.

I have a favorite here. It is not perfect by photographer standards, but I love it. Can you guess?

http://www.haroldlopeznussa.com/

072817-sunlight-streaming-ConcordMA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

081217-lotus-on-Lakeside-Drive

081317-dune-path-New-Shoreham-RI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

080817-acorns-Blackstone-Blvd-RI

081217-lichen-on-tree-New-Shoreham

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

081317-see-through-whelk-shell

081617-turtle-on-Painted-Rock-BI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

081417-New-Harbor-boats

081517-red-geranium-rhode-island

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Yes this post’s title is toying with the name of the famous John Singer Sargent painting “Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose,” which KerryCan told me she liked.

The roses in New Shoreham are so abundant this year, I couldn’t stop taking pictures. I admire these roses because they do their own thing. They need no attention from humans. If they feel like climbing up a tree or entwining themselves with acres of poison ivy, they will just do it.

I’m also posting a water-lily pond where I saw a rough-hewn guy in a beat-up car place a rescued turtle. Other photos include a typical New Shoreham dirt road, Suzanne’s daughter’s monkey enjoying a rare respite, a deer, and Stuga40’s breakfast idea (flax seeds and pumpkin kernels on cereal).

071317-Block-Island-roses-1

 

071317-Block-Island-roses-4

 

 

 

 

 

071317-Block-Island-roses-3

 

071317-Block-Island-roses-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

070917-dirt-road-New-Shoreham-RI

 

071317-Block-Island-water-lilies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

070917-monkey-in-early-morning

 

071417-lovely-but-oh-the-ticks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

070717-flax-seed-pumpkin-kernels

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: