Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘new england’

Recently, returning from a sunny walk, I heard Three Little Pigs calling out, “Stay positive!”

Sometimes my town is like that.

Today’s photos show that in New England it can be both spring and winter on the same day, graveyards are peaceful for walking, the deCordova museum’s outdoor art is currently free, and a candle in the window can symbolize hope.

Let me know what needs more explanation. Probably the Andy Goldsworthy art at deCordova. It’s not a mausoleum despite the graveyard theme here. It’s a kind of sculpture that will do magical things when there’s a heavy rain. It’s called Watershed.

The glass milk bottles are from a farm that delivers a range of necessities. (I’m feeling grateful today to all the delivery people in America. Stay well!)

 

031920-milkman-delivers-a-lot

032220-bank-in-bloom

032320-March-we-hardly-knew-ya

032020-gnarled-tree-by-church

032020-gravestones-and-chimneys

032020-will-country-beat-back-extra-deaths?

031420-not-exactly-a-gravestonejpg

032020-old-graveyard-on-hill

031420-see-thru-door-deCordova

031420-Goldsworthy-expect-water-cascade

031420-typical-scene-in-ConcordMA

031520-lantern-on-wall

031620-oddly-positioned-birdhouse

032320-snow-window-night

032220-candle-symbol-of-life

 

 

Read Full Post »

012920-window-ConcrdMa

I wanted to do another photo post but didn’t have very many photos. That’s mainly because I have been doing my daily walk indoors when it’s not nice out. ‘Round and ’round indoors. Kind of dull.

So I went to a couple free art exhibits, and now I have more pictures.

In Providence, Racine Holly was showing some dramatic skies at a church. When I went in, I didn’t see anyone around. Very trusting. I could hear construction workers talking behind a screen at least. I’m sharing the two oils I liked best. They both had “sold” stickers. The second one was tiny.

Then I went to the Bell Gallery at Brown University, where there was a show of work by Brown art professor Wendy Edwards that had been recommended by critic Cate McQuaid at the Boston Globe. I find I like art that McQuaid likes.

021720-free-Providence-art-gallery

This artist had a lot of works related to reproduction. The giant peach looks great in the Globe article but up close was “too buch for be,” to quote the Elephant’s Child. Below are a few paintings I liked better.

While at the Bell Gallery, I also took a picture of a Brown University Design Workshop pedestal that I didn’t quite understand. It looks like a range of stamping techniques carved in different styles. But if you used one as a stamp, the words would be backwards. It’s probably just to show potential clients what can be done.

The final six photos reflect recent travels in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Note the path of rose petals a clever florist scattered to her door for Valentine’s Day shoppers to follow.

If anything needs more explanation, please let me know in Comments. (Did you get where I’m trying to imitate Magritte?)

021720-dramatic-Racine-Holly-sky

021720--small-Racine-Holly-painting

021720-exhibit-in-Providence-church

021720-no-idea-but-I-like-it

021720-artist-Wendy-Edwards-likes-fruit-with-seeds

021720-Brown-U-art-prof-shows-where-you=-come-from

021720-Brown-U-Design-carved-pedestal

020320-bring-your-own-container

020320-sign-in-Providence-about-a-horse

021320-rose-petal-path-to-florist

021420-bouquet

020620-Magritte-in-the-neighborhood

020820-Magritte-moon

 

Read Full Post »

092118-Swedish-flag-on-Peace-Day092118-Egyptian-flag-International-Peace-Day

Except for the cannon balls at the Civil War monument in New York City, these photos are all from my walks in Massachusetts.

The town of Concord recognizes the International Day of Peace every year by putting up the flags of all members of the United Nations. This year I sent photos of my relatives’ countries of origin to them — Sweden and Egypt.

The Old Manse, run by the Trustees of Reservations, is decorating for fall. Its most famous tenants were author Nathaniel and artist Sophia Hawthorne. Tour guides like to show visitors where the couple carved window messages with her diamond ring.

The injured Blackpoll warbler had a tough fall migration and didn’t make it through the night. I did learn from Kim that one should put an injured bird in a “small, warm, dark box for night. If living in the morning, drip a little sugar water into mouth and release.” Something to keep in mind.

The pumpkin has an important quotation from former Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black about a free press. My neighbor puts 24 small pumpkins on her fence posts every year near Halloween and inscribes something on each. This year the words are from Supreme Court justices, the 19th Amendment (giving women the vote), Massachusetts justice Margaret Marshall (making the state the first to allow gay marriage), and the like.

I wind up with another neighbor’s new tree house and a couple fungi photos. There seems to be a huge array of fungi in town this year, some of them very peculiar looking. We also have a lot of mosquitoes. Too much rain?

092918-Old-Manse

092918-clouds-over-North-Bridge

100918-fall-in-ConcordMA

092018-Civil-War-cannon-balls-NYC

092918-injured-Blackpoll warbler

092818-Justice-Black-addresses-free-press-on-pumpkin

100518-treehouse

100918-weird-fungus-in-cemetery

100918-fungi-at-Sleepy-Hollow

 

Read Full Post »

070218-sunflower-king

I wanted to share a few recent photos. Most of them were taken by me in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, but Stuga40 sent the flower cross from her neighboorhood park in Stockholm. It’s part of the Swedish Midsommar tradition.

The KindnessRocksProject seemed like a wonderful idea. You take a rock when you or others need a little kindness and you leave a rock with a kind message for someone else. This iteration of the project was at a day camp, where children were working on the messages.

The next two photos were taken in newly preserved land along the Concord River, a beautiful area for walking and enjoying nature. After that, there’s a geranium that is glowing in the evening light. If I had taken the shot from the other side, it wouldn’t have looked nearly as magical.

Next is some street art on the remnant of an old building in downtown Providence, an area where a morning walk always provides curious photo ops.

The street art is followed by three experiments with sunlight and shadow and then two of my grandchildren at the parade on the Fourth of July.

I felt ambivalent about the Fourth this year, when Frederick Douglass’s speech “What Is the Fourth of July to the Slave?” seemed more relevant than ever and the darker parts of the Declaration of Independence took on new prominence. And to the kids pictured here, all the parade meant was candy, and things did not end well.

Not to worry. Gives us a variety of goals to aim for next year.

062118-midsommar-Sweden

062518-the-kindness-rock-project.-dot-comJPG

062518-read-a-kindness-rockJPG

062618-conservation-land-Concord-MA

062618-meadow-at-october-farm

070218-geraniums-glow-at-eventide

070218-street-portrait-Providence-RI

062618-let-there-be-grapes

062618-weeds-and-morning-shadows

062118-light-shadow-leaves

070418-looking-for-candy-at-parade

 

Read Full Post »

060118-not-a-fox-6tag

This is not a fox. Or as RenĂ© Magritte might say, “Ceci n’est pas un renard.”

I crept up on it slowly, slowly near the North Bridge, wondering why it stayed so still. Didn’t it see me?

So much for my eyesight: It was a statue. But I did see a real fox crossing a road Friday. (I knew it must be a fox because it trotted like a cartoon fox and had a long, bushy tail.) I have also seen a fawn with its mother and a little weasel recently.

Alas, I wasn’t fast enough with the camera for any of those. I can give you mental pictures only — the deer ambling in a leisurely way, the fox trotting, and the weasel a high-speed blur.

My other photos are mostly accounts of spring in New England, although I couldn’t resist shooting the funny bar inside an actual bank vault. It was located in a Harvard Square restaurant called the Hourly Oyster.

Next you have a view of the Buttrick House garden in Minuteman National Park, an evening shot of our dogwood, a morning shot of a neighbor’s lupines (they do remind me of visiting Sweden’s west coast last year), roses, clematis, honeysuckle, and topiary.

The last two photos are from Rhode Island — early morning at an old house and yellow iris near where Suzanne’s family lives.

052318-vault-at-Hourly-Oyster-CambridgeMA

052318-Buttrick-garden-North-Bridge-ConcordMA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

053018-dogwood-from-window

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

060718-roses-on-fence

060718-clematis-Concord-MA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

060618-honeysuckle-Concord-MA

060718-topiary-Concord-MA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

052618-early-morning-weathered-house

052818-yellow-iris-wetlands-Providence

Read Full Post »

There’s been a bit of a drought in my picture taking. I got so tired of winter, and now in spring I’m reluctant to shoot the same photos I shoot every year. Although when you think about it, it’s kind of beautiful that the same crocus, hellabore, and winter aconite pop up over the same creative neighbor’s stonewall year after year.

We’ve finally had some spring in New England. The very best sign of that was a lemonade stand I saw yesterday.

Two young girls were selling lemonade and flavored iced tea ($.75, mint leaves optional) and Rice Krispies Treats ($.25) while playing duets on the clarinet and violin. They told me they were raising money for a charity that provides instruments and music lessons to children in Haiti.

They were adorable. One girl pointed out their homemade signs. She said, “We didn’t have any big cardboard to make signs, so we got pizza for dinner last night.” The pizza box provided the needed cardboard.

The other pictures are pretty self-explanatory. The crocus flowers peeked up just before we had one of our numerous late snowstorms. The gorgeous architecture and shadows are thanks to the preservation ethos in Providence.

I was thrilled to see the opportunistic pansy poking through a stone curb. And the trout lilies. I had to take two shots of the trout lilies, the only wildflowers that still flourish after I took a walking class in local conservation lands 25 years ago.

(No worries: I didn’t steal flowers from the woods but was able to buy several varieties of wildflowers at a plant sale. Sometimes a solitary May Apple shows up near the trout lilies in my yard, but it is sad and lonely. The trillium never had a prayer as it is fussy about soil and likes to hang with a group. Perhaps the wild geraniums will bloom this year.)

042818-lemonade-for-worthy-cause

042818-young-musicians-raise-money

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

041218-crocus-blooming-before-storm

042318-Providence-architecture-and-shadows

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

042218-pansies-in-wall

042118-trout-lily-stucco-wall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

042118-trout-lily-brick-wal

 

Read Full Post »

032918-early-flowers-Monument-St

Yesterday was beautiful. Everyone wanted to be outside. I walked along one of my favorite woodland trails, which connects to the cemetery. At gravesites, there were more Christmas decorations, brown and tattered, than Easter ones. I think if I were a doing cemetery remembrances at holidays, I’d remove them when I took down the decorations at my house. But perhaps family members don’t live nearby.

Pansies seem to be favored for spring.

On Monument Street, a man waiting by a gift shop for his wife volunteered as I passed, “Nice to be in the sun again. It’s been a long winter.” Indeed. In like a lion, out like a lamb.

The Easter Egg Hunt was at my house. The magnificent matzoh balls (made with ginger and nutmeg) are the work of my sister-in-law Lisa.

Whatever you celebrated this weekend I hope that your day was lovely.

033118-cemetery-shadows

033118-flowers-at-gravestone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

033118-bunny-planter-in-graveyard

040118-on-the-move-at-Easter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

040118-Easter-basket-haul

040118-Easter-basket

 

 

 

 

 

 

033018-matzoh-balls-by-Lisa

 

 

 

040118-Easter-chalk-art

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: