Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘donations’

salad-850x478large

Photos: Off Their Plate
Off Their Plate cooks and delivers healthful meals to healthcare workers.

Amid government failures, can individual efforts ever be enough in a catastrophe like today’s?  I think they can be because feeling good about doing something concrete feeds on itself and simultaneously inspires others. You are probably doing things yourself, like donating to a food bank or calling friends you don’t normally call who are at home alone.

Suzanne, for example, has signed up on Twitter to promote a desperate call from Rhode Island emergency doctors for masks and other personal protection equipment (PPE). Please write in Comments what you are up to. No matter how small, I am interested.

Devra First has a nice story at the Boston Globe, “With restaurants closed for dine-in business, the industry is suffering, and many people have lost their jobs. At the same time, workers on the front lines of the coronavirus don’t have time to prepare nutritious meals to help keep them going. A new organization, Off Their Plate, is working to address both problems.

“It began when Natalie Guo, a medical student at Harvard who previously worked in business, reached out to local chefs Ken Oringer (Little Donkey, Toro, and more) and Tracy Chang (Pagu). The idea: Raise money to provide meals to health care workers, and pay cooks now out of work to make them.

‘In 10 days, we raised something like $80,000,’ Guo says, and the effort has expanded to New York, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, and Los Angeles.

“By [March 26], its fifth day of operation in Boston, Off Their Plate had served close to 1,000 meals in the area — to Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women’s, Faulkner, Boston Medical Center, and Beth Israel Deaconess, with more coming soon, including Carney Hospital, Boston Health Care for the Homeless, and other federally qualified health centers. Meals go to everyone from nurses to hazmat teams to the people working the front desk. ‘It’s a massive effort here,’ Guo says. ‘It’s not just MDs. Very soon this is going to consume the entire health force.’

One hundred percent of donations go to wages and meal costs. According to a ticker on the website [March 27], Off Their Plate has so far raised enough to cover 6,500 meals, more than 2,000 work hours, and $32,500 in wages. A $100 donation covers the cost of providing 10 meals.

“ ‘It’s been really fortuitous to be able to get a lot of the people who are not able to collect unemployment or people we decided to reach out to … and be able to help them earn some money,’ Oringer says. ‘A lot of them have been with us for more than 10 years. We are trying to take care of our family and our community. We’re getting food from purveyors, from fishermen, who are getting really, really hurt by all of this.’ …

“They are creating recipes and safety protocols that can be passed along to partner chefs in other cities, so they too can join the effort. ‘We want to make sure we are taking the utmost precaution in the health and safety of our own employees and the people they are feeding. The last thing we want to do is be part of the problem,’ Chang says.” More here.

Erin Kuschner has another take on the story at Boston.com, which is separate but related to the Boston Globe. She adds, “Guo, who was doing her clinical rotation at Massachusetts General Hospital before she launched Off Their Plate, is amazed by the charitable actions of everyone involved.

“ ‘Our goal is to serve Boston as well as we can, which means getting to volunteer for the homeless and getting to areas where healthcare workers are really in need,’ she said.”  The unemployed restaurant workers get paid, but not the others involved. Of them Guo says, ‘Not a single person has asked for a single dollar of service, and that’s just really incredible.’ ”

Off Their Plate meals being prepared before delivery.

roberto-andrea-herbs-by-tclarge

Read Full Post »

This extra post is just to give you suggestions for where you can send donations. Send love through your thoughts. Send donations to Doctors without Borders or one of these other relief organizations, here. You can specify which disaster you want your aid to go to. I personally do unspecified in case other disasters follow and the money is needed for them.

Thank you, Asakiyume, for the list.

Photo: NBCNews

Read Full Post »

I like to listen to a jazz radio station out of Worcester, WICN.

The other day the announcer mentioned an effort funded by TD Bank’s charitable foundation to collect old school instruments and refurbish them for a new generation.

If you live near Worcester and have been wondering what to do with those drums and violins, consider dropping them off at 50 Portland St. If you don’t live near Worcester, you might consider looking for a similar program in your town — or even starting one. Other TD Banks might help out. Banks in general can be good sources of such community support.

Here’s what the website says: “WICN 90.5, the NPR jazz station in Worcester, and Worcester Public Schools continue their collaboration called Instrumental Partners. The program collects used musical instruments from Central New England residents for the benefit of public school students. ‘We’re approaching 100 instruments donated so far!’ said WICN General Manager Gerry Weston. Instrumental Partners began in 2012.

“All instruments are accepted: brass, wind, string, percussion, acoustic, electric, etc. Worcester Public Schools Performing Arts Liaison Lisa Leach said, ‘We are very excited about this collaboration and putting instruments in the hands of young people who are unable to purchase or rent them, but still have the desire and work ethic to make music an integral part of their developing lives.’ ” More.

If you want to call first, the number is 508 752 0700.

12/27/13 Update. Today I took the oboe and the alto sax below to WICN for the Worcester Public Schools music program. Now a new generation of children will play them.

school-instruments-sax=oboe

Read Full Post »

Do men and women have different approaches to charitable giving?

In the July 12 Christian Science Monitor, Temma Ehrenfeld writes that the Women’s Philanthropy Institute at Indiana University has found that “female-headed households are more likely to give to charity than male-headed households, and that in nearly all income groups women give more than men.”

In addition, continues Ehrenfeld, “Insiders say women have their own culture in grant-making. …

“For example, the Global Fund for Women (GFW), unlike most grant-givers, accepts handwritten proposals of any length and in any language, and is unusually open to grants for general purposes rather than specific projects. It also funds meetings to create networks of women activists.

“The approach demonstrated its power during Egypt’s Arab Spring, said Christine Switzer, GFW’s director of development. ‘Our women were able to mobilize together,’ she said, pointing to 77 grants totaling more than $1 million GFW has given to Egyptian women, young and old.”

I often wonder, though, Are women more generous to the underprivileged when they become heads of state? I doubt it. Indira Gandhi? Maggie Thatcher? Golda Meir? Kirchner of Argentina? Let me know if you see studies on this topic.

Meanwhile, there’s more to read at the Monitor.

Photograph: http://www.dw.de

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: