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Posts Tagged ‘seekonk river’

Honk Parade, Somerville, Massachusetts.

For the first time in years, I’m at home for Halloween. I’ve been alternating between Suzanne and John’s homes, which has been a lot of fun. Besides, all the children in my neighborhood grew up and moved away, so there have been no trick-or-treaters on my street for a long time.

Now some young families have moved in. I want to see the little ones in their costumes — and avoid driving on such a night. I’ll let you know if I get any takers for the candy, Goldfish cracker bags, or juice boxes.

Meanwhile, I want to share a few photos of the season and hope you like some even if you don’t like Halloween.

I’m starting with the Honk Parade in Somerville. It is on the Columbus/ Indigenous People’s Weekend every non-Covid year.

The band playing at a local church’s fall festival is the wonderful bluegrass group Southern Rail. I can’t resist putting one of their videos at the end of this post.

The boaters are enjoying the Sudbury River in Massachusetts. The meditative bench is on the Seekonk River in Rhode Island.

I love the idea of six-word novels. The creative woman on Sudbury Road had numerous “novels” on pumpkins this year.

Across the street from her yard, the public library featured children’s story books. I’m sure you recognize Curious George.

Don’t know who the banjo players are, given they lack any features, but one seems to be a Union soldier.

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Here are a few recent photos from Rhode Island and Massachusetts. I took all but the shivery January 1 New Shoreham plunge, which is the work of Sandra M. Kelly. I doubt I would have been brave enough even to go watch these hardy souls freeze on such a cold day.

What can I tell you about the other photos? The Hmong church near my grandson’s play school was a surprise. I knew about Hmong refugees in California, Minnesota, and Central Massachusetts. Didn’t know they were in Providence. A wonderful book about the Hmong immigrant experience is The Late Homecomer, by Kao Kalia Yang, who grew up in St. Paul.

I include a porcine household god from Providence, a bathrobe in the guest room where I awaited the arrival of my new granddaughter in December, and two aspects of the Seekonk River on January 1.

The photo I call “In Trial Realest, a Message from Beyond,” is one I was determined to capture while the sign was broken. It called to me from my office window as it lit up at dusk. I’m glad I caught it when I did, because the neon letters are now all working, and its message is no longer as interesting.

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In January I blogged here about ForSpaciousSkies.com and a guy who thinks we would all be a lot better off if we looked at the sky more.

I have to say, he has a point. When we lived on the 18th floor in Minneapolis in the ’90s, we were constantly admiring clouds from our balcony. And now, since reading about Jack Borden’s crusade, I’ve begun to pay attention to the sky again.

I find that looking at clouds for a few minutes in the middle of everything else that is going on can really feel good.

Two of these photos were taken near my house, and one is over the Seekonk River in Providence.

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