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Posts Tagged ‘friends’

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I’ve been meaning for some time to post about writer friends, and I’ve hesitated only out of fear I’m leaving someone out.

Laurie Graves is someone I met through this blog. I’ve ordered one of her books and although think I’ll like it as much as I like her blog, I haven’t read it yet.

Speaking of bloggers, there are a couple others whose style I admire. In addition to the inimitable KerryCan, I find the writing of APiermanSister and ABereavedDad frequently amazing.

I also want to highlight writers I know personally. You can read about poet Kate Colby, here; about poet Nancy Greenaway, here; and poet Ronnie Hess, here. And check out the gifted interstitial storyteller Francesca Forrest here, at GoodReads.

Providence-based Colby has numerous books to her credit, often about New England. She has taught in Gloucester, Mass., and co-led art-and-poetry tours at the deCordova Museum in Lincoln. She and her husband were enormously helpful in providing a pied-à-terre to Suzanne and Erik when those sneaky characters were looking at houses in Providence without telling family members they were leaving New York. (We were over the moon when we finally heard.)

Nancy Greenaway is the muse of New Shoreham, R.I. She only just retired from a long and inspired career of teaching English at the island school and engaging students in poetry. I visited her classroom for her recent going-away party and was impressed with all the sources of imagination activation on her walls and tables. A happy place.

Ronnie Hess is someone I met in childhood on a different island. When I think of her, I think of so many shared experiences — the way we wrote and directed our first Ocean Beach teenage play, for example, and the way I envied her dancing the Slop with Stuey Shaw. Her poems about her Fire Island childhood are wonderfully evocative, as are those about about her husband’s family escaping the Holocaust and about Wisconsin, where she lives. She has a special gift for describing nature.

Francesca is a cherished friend I first met when we were copy editors at the Harvard Business Review in 1995. We have continued to work together off and on and to share a wide range of interests. She taught me a lot about blogging. I once created a haiku for Francesca about a dream she’d described one lunchtime. I wrote that in her dream “the moon was trending downward,” adopting some of the business jargon from our workplace. We still chuckle about that.

I apologize if I’ve left out any good friends. I blame age. In fact, lately I’ve startled myself with weird forgetfulness. Like sending graduation checks twice to the Anderson sisters or wondering why the world was blurry that day I forgot I still wear glasses despite cataract surgery. I don’t think it’s going to get better.

dreamtrenchescanoeingcoversmall

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Imagine how chuffed I was to see this article about Suzanne by Charmaine Gahan!

A close friend since kindergarten, Charmaine has been a huge support to Suzanne and the birthstone-jewelry company that hosts this blog, Luna & Stella.

In a delightful report, Charmaine describes how her whole family joined Suzanne’s family in New York City over school vacation to lend a hand at the Playtime trade show, a big deal for promoting new products to retail shops around the world.

Among the highlights of Suzanne’s growing collections are sweet Mama + Me bracelets, just in time for Mothers Day (May 8), and some stunning vintage lockets.

Notes the website, “All of the lockets in the Luna & Stella Vintage Collection were made in Providence, East Providence or Attleboro between 1880 and 1940.”

Why vintage mixed with contemporary? That’s kind of an interesting story, too, being the result of a hunt for beautiful hinges to use in new lockets. After the long search, Suzanne concluded that they just don’t make smooth and subtle hinges like they used to.

But sometimes an apparent dead end can lead to even better ideas, and Luna & Stella’s cool mixing of old and new seems to be an idea that is catching on.

At the Concord Journal (here), you can read more about the two friends and their families working the trade show in New York during the coldest week of the year.

Photo: Charmaine’s girls join Suzanne to look over the Mama + Me collection from Luna & Stella.

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At around age 2-1/2, small people begin to be ready for friendship. My almost-three-years grandson plays with his friend now, instead of just in the same space.

They understand each other’s words. They find the same things funny — leaning way, way back on the swing, climbing back up the chute of the double slide, feeding wood chips to mitten puppets, getting ready to kick the ball down the hill when suddenly it decides to go ahead without you.

I spent a little time Saturday morning with my grandson, his friend, and her mother. I told the mother how much I love the learning-language stage. She agreed and gave me an example of how it can be confusing when one word has two meanings.

She said she had told her daughter that the new baby brother had no teeth you could see but that the teeth were in his gums. Sometime later, when her daughter asked what she was chewing and she answered that she was chewing “gum,” the little girl thought her baby brother’s teeth must be in there.

Two and a half is a time so full of strange new things, she probably didn’t think it was any stranger than anything else.

A WordPress blogger in Australia [subsequent correction: not Australia but B.C Canada in the Okanagan] has another cute story, here.

Hungry mitten puppets

get ready to kick

the ball got away

casting light, not shadow

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