Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘shadows’

shadow1

Photo: Narek Harutyunyan
Armenian shadow puppetry uses light and shadow to bring folklore to life. Going back to the 1300s, the art is being revived in a more child-oriented form today.

Throughout the centuries, people have used puppets to express ideas that would be hard to express directly. The oldest version of shadow puppetry in Armenia addressed religious and reproductive topics. In its revived form, shadow puppetry passes Armenian folklore to a new generation.

Allison Keyes reports at Smithsonian, “Behind a screen, puppets mounted on long, slim sticks dance and sway, twirling, backlit so that only their dark shadows appear, while puppeteers called Karagyoz players sing, provide sound effects and create voices for the characters. An interpreter translates, telling in English the Armenian stories like a libretto for an opera, so the audience will understand.

“The Armenian Shadow Puppet Theater, known as Karagyoz, was especially popular in the 18th century. But it has roots dating back to the 14th century, with shared sources in South Asia, the Middle East and North Africa.

“ ‘They are oldest in Egypt and the countries of Maghrib, Greece and the Ottoman Empire,’ explains Levon Abrahamian, an anthropologist and a curator of the 2018 Armenia program at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. ‘Armenians were doing this in the Ottoman Empire because part of Armenia, Western Armenia, is now in Turkey.’

“Now, a new version of the Armenian Shadow Puppet Theater, called Ayrogi, is touring Armenia, staging modern performances reviving the traditions of the past. Ayrogi performed at this year’s Folklife Festival. … Some of the players travel by horseback, stopping to perform horse shows, songs, folk dances and shadow puppet shows.

“[Director Armen Kirakosyan says], ‘In Armenian theater, the puppets were colored in black, so it is a principle of shadow. The light comes from behind them in such a way that you have only shadows.’ Black and white, he says, has a far greater impact on the imagination, and the characters develop a much more menacing or hilarious presence in the minds of the viewers. …

“The stories Ayrogi tells now are for a general audience, and many are adapted for children. Modern shadow puppetry, Abrahamian says, is based on traditional folktales such as ”The Cat of Martiros.’ Martiros is a popular Armenian name meaning ‘martyr,’ and the theater company performs a series of tales about him.

“One story begins with a man who is content and free of troubles, says Kirakosyan in Armenian as Abrahamian translates. He laughs because the man’s life is about to get complicated.

“ ‘The man is complaining about this mouse, saying it is eating his shoes. . . People came and said, “We will help you,” giving him a cat. The cat solved the problem but created other problems, meowing, and the man says he can’t sleep. So the people say, “it is hungry, thirsty—give him milk!” But where would he get the milk? So they give him a cow to solve the problem. He had to have a field to have something for the cow to eat some grass. Lots of problems come, so they give him a wife! Now he has a lot of children, and when he is dying, he calls his eldest son, and tells him, “You can do anything you want, but never let a cat come to your house!” ‘ ”

More here.

Photo: Narek Harutyunyan
Armen Kirakosyan, director of the Ayrudzi horseback riding club and Ayrogi puppet theater, poses with shadow puppets.

shadow3

Read Full Post »

Lavner-trumpet-lilies-021318

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today I thought I’d start my picture roundup with Lynn’s photo from Florida. Lynn says she was first introduced to trumpet lilies when she toured Africa with her cabaret show. I definitely don’t have any trumpet lilies growing outside my house today.

What I do have is ice, snow, and shadows. Here goes. The icicles were shot back in January. The tulips were a little joke in February (I got them in the store and planted them before the snow). The other photos don’t need much explanation. You know I love shadows.

The moose is waiting for the mail lady.

011917-icicles-on-pine-tree

021818-6tag-store-tulips-planted-before-snowstorm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

031418-icicle-on-dogwood

031418-lichen-and-snowy-branches

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

031418-unshoveled-staircase

022118-shadows-on-picket-fence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

022718-leaf-shadows-stone-wall

022118-I-Love-Shadows

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

031118-moose-waiting-for-mail

Read Full Post »

I’m back to taking walks near my home and looking for interesting shadows. The current collection of photos includes leaf shadows on a tree trunk. Only a couple dog walkers were out when I shot this, but I noted an unusual number of cars outside a house flying “2017” balloons. Probably a late-night graduation bash. All was quiet as the grave at 6:30 a.m.

Nearby, blue lupines caught my attention. I admired many lovely ones in Sweden and was happy to see that, while I was gone, a whole batch was blooming along my usual walking route.

I’m also sharing a grapevine over a bench, a bonsai tree near the church herb garden, and a deep red rose on a white picket fence.

More unusual: the big playhouse at the nursery school and some elaborate digital art by high school students.

061117-leaf-shadows

061117-lupines-ConcordMA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

051817-bench-under-grape-arbor

060917-bonsai-and-herb-garden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

061117-deep-red-rose-white-picket-fence

060917-playhouse

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

052117-CCHS-digital-art

Read Full Post »

My hostess knows just the kind of pictures I like. Lots of sunlight and shade. While my husband and I were window shopping in Stockholm today, she went for her seven-mile run and took these photos along the way.

052917-woodland-shadows-stockholm

052917-photographer-and--shadows-stockholm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

052917--map-and-shadows-stockholm9_120138

052917-flowers-and-shadows-stockholm

 

Read Full Post »

Photographic Themes

I’m starting to notice that my photos (all taken on my mobile phone) have recurrent themes. Today’s nine pictures reflect a few of those interests: words on signs, shadows, plants, nature, art. Either I’m in a rut, or I’m going to get really good at a few themes.

090716-float-like-butterfly

090216-worms-and-crawlers-concord

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

090716-outcasts-outlast

091716-umbrella-center-concord

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

090516-volunteer-flowers-concord-ma

091116-growing-thru-wall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

091516-danish-window-ornament-shadow

091616-clouds-over-supermarket

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

090216-rr-reflection-concord-ma

Read Full Post »

This healthy sunflower is at the Old Manse in Concord. The Trustees of Reservations always plant a big garden there, with pumpkins growing between the corn rows.

The lantern-like seed pods in the next photo embellish a tree beside the Providence River. The leaf shadows on brick were spotted not far away, along a grubby Providence sidewalk.

Can you read the plaque on the Providence Journal building? It shows the crazy height that the water reached in the infamous Hurricane of ’38. Golly!

My husband says the barrier at Fox Point will prevent flooding like that from ever happening again. I don’t know. Were the engineers aware of global warming when they started construction in 1960?

New Shoreham (in the next picture) was also battered in the hurricane of ’38. In fact, the storm wiped out the island economy on land and sea. The fishermen and farmers were not insured against such a catastrophe. No wonder people there remember that hurricane!

One thing that is different since 1938, as I learned in a splendid book called A Wind to Shake the World, communities in the path of a hurricane now get plenty of warning. But in 1938, when houses on Long Island, New York, were washing out to sea, no one up north knew it.

A few other shots of New Shoreham: a Wednesday farmers market, the Little Free Library, a view through a stone wall, a rumpled morning sky, and the North Light.

081916-sunflower-at-Old-Manse

082916-little-lanterns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

083016-shadows

083026-sign-re-hurricane-of 1938

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

082816-Old-Harbpr-bye-for-now

082416-farmers-market-New-Shoreham

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

082016-Free-LIbrary-BI-3

082216-thru-a-wall-darkly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

082816-morning-sky-New-Shoreham-RI

082616-North-Light-New-Shoreham

 

Read Full Post »

Happy Mother’s Day to all mothers! This mother is indulging her interest in photography today (the simple kind: pointing and shooting with a phone). So here are a few recent pictures and explanations for the less obvious.

For example: I went out for a walk one evening and was surprised to encounter Morris Dancers on the steps of the library. They seemed to be practicing, not performing. Where would Morris dancers be performing in late April, after Patriots Day? That was a mystery. Another mystery to me was how young men and boys get drawn into performing Morris Dance. I’m sure it’s good exercise, but …

I include shots of a clay bird’s shadow on my wall and hedge shadows on a sidewalk. The fence with the stage coach and other old timey images painted along the railings is in Providence — easy to overlook when walking past.

Providence plaques and memorials. The one of Martin Luther King Jr. is on a bridge with a view of Water Place. The monument to an event Rhode Island celebrates as the real first engagement of the American Revolution — the colonists’  clash with Brits on the HMS Gaspee — is partly obscured by bushes.

Little old Rhode Island gets no respect. It was also the first colony to sign on for independence, May 4, 1776. Who knew?

042316-daffodils-and-white-feince

042616-1821-universalist-church-providence

 

 

 

 

 

 

WP_20160505_10_01_32_Pro

042416-branches-shadows

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

042416-Morris-dancers-stepping-out

043016-bird-in-window

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

042616-stage-coach-on-fence-providence

043016-pavement-shadows

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WP_20160503_07_47_05_Pro

WP_20160504_07_32_57_Pro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WP_20160504_07_33_23_Pro

 

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: